Glossary

 

Here is a Glossary for some of the more unique on uncommon items and ingredients I use for some of my Global Recipes. I have linked the ingredient to one of the more common items to cook it with.

  • Brown Betty – is a name given to an early era baked pudding dessert made by those who came to America during the 1600′s. There are now numerous variations of this dessert that use many different types of fruit, but the most well known is Apple Brown Betty or simply Brown Betty. A combination of tart apples, (Granny Smith and Gala work well or other combinations of two to three semi-tart varieties) are cut into slices and mixed with sugar, cinnamon, vanilla, and lemon juice.   Pieces of bread are torn and baked or browned on the stovetop in butter, basically creating breadcrumbs to be used as a layer or filling. The sweetened and seasoned fruit is then layered with the breadcrumbs to form a baked pudding of fruit and crispy breadcrumbs that is served warm and is often topped with whipped cream or ice cream.
  • Buckle – A Buckle is a sweet dessert that is made from a cake batter traditionally topped with berries, which is topped with a streusel type topping. The batter rises up as it bakes and the berries and streusel topping sink at uneven intervals, forming a buckled affect in the cake. Originally, buckle was made as a single layer cake topped with blueberries. However, over the years a variety of berries, fruits and toppings have been added to make different versions of this cake dessert. 
  • Cobbler – A cobbler is a type of deep-dish fruit dessert with a thick biscuit or pie dough crust that is prepared and then served warmed to guests. It is very similar to a pie except that the crust is thicker and it is traditionally placed only on top. However, over the years, ingredients and preparation methods have been created that bake the cobbler crust on the top for some recipes and on the bottom for others.  In the United States a cobbler is typically made with fruit or berries but in the United Kingdom it is typically a meat dish. In the United States, peach, blueberry and cherry cobblers are among the most popular varieties.
  • Crisp – A crisp is a sweet dessert made with baked fruit as the bottom layer, which is topped with a crumbly topping. It is commonly referred to as a “fruit crisp” or as a crisp described by the name of the fruit in the dessert, such as apple crisp, a three fruit crisp, or something similar. A typical crisp combines a variety of ingredients, which include brown sugar, oatmeal and nuts that are mixed with the butter, flour and cinnamon to create a granular topping that is spread over the baked fruit.
  • Crumble – A crumble is a dessert with a crumb topping made from flour, sugar, and butter combined into a mixture that is sprinkled over sliced fruit and baked. The topping is made up of basically the same ingredients as a pastry except it doesn’t contain any liquid. When the crumble bakes the butter melts and mixes with the flour and sugar to create a crunchy, crumbly topping. A crumble is very similar to a crisp except that the topping for a crisp generally contains oats and often nuts, giving it a coarser texture that the crumbles toppings.
  • Doenjang  - is a traditional Korean fermented soybean paste. Its name literally means “thick paste” in Korean.  Also used as a condiment with Bulgogi or in marinades.
  • Fish Sauce with Thai Chilis - “Prik Nam Pla”  - one of the four condiments you get at Thai Restaurants.  
  • Grunt – A grunt is a dessert, traditionally served on America’s east coast that is a combination of a pie and a cobbler. It consists of fruit, most often berries, which are cooked beneath a crust of biscuit or dumpling type dough. The Grunt was named for the echo of sounds coming from the bubbling fruit under the dough as it cooks. A Grunt is similar in preparation to the Slump with the exception that the Grunt is steam cooked and the Slump is baked.
  • Gochujang – is an amazing chili paste that is used in Korean cooking and also as a condiment.  It is spicy but with a little bit of sweetness.
  • Kimchi – a traditional Korean fermented dish made of vegetables with garlic, salt and chili past, the seasoning varies a little depending on the family. It is most commonly made with napa cabbage and other vegetables such as radish, green onion, chive, and cucumber. Kimchi is the most common banchan, or side dish, in Korean cuisine. Kimchi is also a main ingredient for other common Korean dishes such as Kimchi stew;  kimchi jjigae), Kimchi soup ( kimchi gook), and kimchi fried rice kimchi bokkeumbap).
  • Lingonberry - Lingonberries collected in the wild are a popular fruit in northern, central and eastern Europe especially in Scandinavia. It tasts and looks very similar to cranberry.
  • Mirin - is an is an essential condiment used in Japanese cuisine, and a sweet rice wine. I like to use this for cooking in stead of sugar if you need to add some sweetness.
  • Miso Paste - Paste to make Japanses Miso Soup.
  • Pandowdy – A pandowdy is a sweet dessert that is made with a pastry or bread dough topping that covers a fruit base made from one or several fruits. Apple Pandowdy is the most common version of this dessert. When prepared, the dough is rolled out into thin circular or square shape matching the shape of the deep baking dish containing the fruit. Nuts, such as sliced almonds, are often added to the Pandowdy dough.
  • Pavlova is a meringue-based dessert named after the Russian ballet dancer Anna Pávlova. It is a cake similar to meringue with a crispy crust and soft, light inner. The dessert is believed to have been created to honour the dancer during or after one of her tours to Australia and New Zealand in the 1920s. Where it was created and the nationality of its creator has been a source of argument between the two nations for many years, but research indicates New Zealand as the source. The dessert is a popular dish and an important part of the national cuisine of both countries, and is frequently served during celebratory or holiday meals such as Christmas lunch.
  • Pearl Sugar – Sugar used in Swedish baking. for decoration.   You can get Pearl Sugar in Ikea.
  • Piece Montée – means “mounted piece.” You may know this dessert by another name – Croquembouche (“crunch in the mouth”). The piece montée is the traditional wedding cake in France. They are often served at baptisms and communions as well.
  • Self Raising Flour -  To make self raising flour you add ½ tsp baking power and ½ tsp salt to every 1 cup of flour.
  • Sesame oil – is an oil from sesame seeds. It is very common cooking oil in the Korean kitchen.
  • Slump – A slump is a dessert that is basically the same as a grunt as far as ingredients and construction. It consists of fruit, berries, or a mixture of fruit and berries, which are cooked beneath a crust of biscuit or dumpling type dough. The difference between the grunt and the slump is that the slump is baked uncovered instead of steamed. Some recipes call for it to be cooked on the stovetop and others use the oven. The slump was given its name because when served on a plate it has a tendency to slump.
  • Suet - It is the hard but flaky fat found on the inside of a cow or sheep around the kidneys and that area of the body. Suet in its raw form crumbles easily into small chunks so much so that my butcher says it covers his floor in bits if he doesn’t have it taken out as soon as possible. In fact unless he knows he has a customer for it he has the abattoir take it out and throw it away and when I want some he gives it to me for free! It also melts at quite a low temperature, which has an effect on how it works in cooking. In some places such as the UK it is sold processed which basically means it is grated and combined with flour to keep the individual pieces from clumping together, and it becomes a sort of dried out short strands, almost granular in texture.
  • Thai chilies – or also called “Bird’s eye chilis” are one of the hottest chills out there.
  • Thai chili pepper with rice vinegar - ” Prik Dong” – one of the four condiments you get at Thai Restaurants. 
  • Vanilla Sugar - Many of my Swedish dessert, asks for vanilla sugar. You can get vanilla sugar at Ikea if you wish or just use vanilla extract .But I did find out that that you can also make vanilla sugar at home. I found this excerpt from Wikipedia, ”Vanilla sugar is a commonly used ingredient of German, Polish, Swedish, Finnish, Danish, Austrian, Czech, Slovakian, Slovenian and other European desserts. Vanilla sugar is made of Costa Rican granulated sugar, with vanilla beans or mixed with vanilla extract. It can be costly and difficult to obtain outside Europe but can be simply made at home. Sometimes it can be replaced with vanilla extract, where one teaspoon equals one package. However, when it is needed as a topping, vanilla extract is unsuitable. Vanilla sugar can be prepared at home by combining approximately 2 cups of white sugar with the scraped seeds of one vanilla bean.”